Welcome to Mrs. Walker's English Site. This website is for students enrolled in Mrs. Walker's 10th grade English classes and their parents. Below is a list of all recent activity related to these classes. Learn more about this site »

Announcements (New as of 4/14)

Monday, April 14th, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

New Announcement!!

Here is the schedule for 10th graders only.  The schedule for 9th, 11th, and 12th are different Tuesday and Wednesday.  See an 11th grade teacher, administrator, or Mr. King for that schedule.

Tuesday 4/15

7:30-9:28 Life Science Parts 1-2
9:28-9:38 BREAK
9:44-11:42 Dodge Ball Tourney (You need a permission slip to play – at student store)

Wednesday 4/16

7:30-8:50 Period 2
8:56-10:16 Period 4
10:22-11:42 Period 6

Thursday 4/17

7:30-8:50 Period 1
8:56-10:16 Period 3
10:22-11:42 Period 5

Friday 4/18

7:30-7:58 Period 1
8:04-8:38 Period 2
8:44-9:12 Period 3
9:18-9:46 Period 4
9:52-10:20 Period 5
10:26-10:52 Period 6
11:07-11:42 Rally

 

Do you have a question for Mrs. Walker?  I’m really nice. I promise!  Email me at millta@fusd.net.

Do you want to receive text notifications and assignment corrections on your phone?  Don’t worry: your phone number is kept private! Text the code @JoinHonors to the phone number (360) 529-5208

51-100 Reading Test

Friday, April 18th, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

Learning Objectives: Show ability to read and analyze 1984 independently by taking a select response assessment (RL10.10).

Academic Vocabulary: All Previous

Homework: Begin reading pages 101-150 and complete 3-4 Dialectical Journal entries for next Friday.

1. Do Now: Review
Take out your reading log and Dialectical Journal for Mrs. Walker to check.  Log on to OARS.  Do not begin the test until instructed to do so.

Review the reading and your DJ entries to study.

2. 1984 51-100 Reading Test
Take the select response assessment on OARS.

Quiz

Friday, April 18th, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

Objectives:  Students will all do well on the assessment.
Homework: Please read the next portion of 1984, pages 100-150, and begin the dialectical journals for that week.
Do Now: Take out your dialectical journal and reading logs.  You will have 5 minutes to review.
1.    Quiz
Log on HERE and take the quiz.  You will have all period to turn it in.
2.    After
Once you are done, please feel free to work on your dialectical journals for next week, or start on next week’s reading.  Here is a link to an online version of 1984.  Please work quietly.

Newspeak

Thursday, April 17th, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

Objective:  Students will evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. (RI 10.8)

Homework:  Continue reading 1984.  Bring your reading log and dialectical journal tomorrow.

Academic vocabulary:  Newspeak, Doublethink, Orwellian, conformity.

Do Now:  Watch the following clip, and, on a new page titled “Newspeak”, answer the questions that follow.  LINK

  • What imagery do you see in the clip which you have seen in 1984?
  • What is the general tone of the commercial?
  • What is the commercial saying about Apple Computers?  Consider the imagery of the commercial, and the themes of 1984.
  1. 1.      Examining Newspeak

Newspeak is the language which The Party is pushing on the premise that one day all thoughtcrime will be impossible, because it will be impossible to think wrongly.  The language is being changed drastically.  Read through this excerpt from chapter 5 and consider the questions that follow.  Answer in the form of a paragraph after discussing with a partner.  chapter 5

  • What is Syme’s general argument for creating Newspeak?
  • Who does Winston put his faith in to continue the English language?  Does it remind you of a letter we read at the beginning of this unit?
  • Is it plausible that by destroying words you could also destroy the thoughts and feelings that coincide with them?
  • In your lifetime, have you seen any instances of words being shortened or changed, while still maintaining a similar idea?
  1. 2.      Newnewspeak

After reading the excerpt from chapter 5, you should have a general understanding of the purpose behind Newspeak and the destruction of language.  What we will do now is move into a modern form of Newspeak, and analyze how well it can be understood.  Read through these poems which were text-in to T-Mobile as a part of a contest, and guess which one won first place:

ENTRY ONE

O hart tht sorz

My luv adorz

He mAks me liv

He mAks me giv

Myslf 2 him

As my luv porz

ENTRY TWO

The wet rustle of rain

can dampen today. Your text

buoys me above oil-rainbow puddles

like a paper boat, so that even

soaked to the skin

I am grinning.

Can you decipher the first one?  In a few sentences, write what the first poem is about.  Also, guess which was first and which was second.

After, see if you can guess these translations of very popular Shakespearean lines:

  • 2b or no 2b thts ?
  • a @(—`— by any oth nme wd sml swEt
  • rm rm w4Ru rm?

 

  1. 3.       A Modern Approach

Read the following article, and fill out the box for SOAPSTone with a partner, just as you did on Monday.  Answer the questions that follow.  Newspeak behind text messaging destruction of the English language

Steps Details from “ Newspeak behind text messaging destruction of the English language?

Determine the Speaker and Occasion   – Consider who is writing the article (are they trustworthy or biased?) and why they are writing about the issue.  
Analyze Audience and Appeals-   Consider who the intended audience is and locate the evidence that appeals to   logos, ethos, and pathos.  
Determine the Purpose – Is it to inform objectively? Is it   to persuade?  Is it to satirize a fault   in society?  Is it to make a thematic   claim?  
Analyze Style and Syntax   – Are their rhetorical questions? Parallel phrases? Repeated motifs aka   symbols/images? Purposeful grammar choices? Figurative language? Analogies or   comparisons?
Analyze Tone and Diction   – What is the tone of the author (Objective or Subjective)? How does the   diction reveal the tone?  

 

  • Can you summarize the author’s main points?  Use the name of the article and author.
  • How does textspeak relate to the novel 1984?  Do you see any similarities between it and Syme’s Newspeak?
  • How could a written language like textspeak influence the way we think?  Would it be positive or negative?

Rhetorical Analysis Introduction

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

Learning Objectives: Analyze “You are Suspect” for rhetorical choices that have purpose (RI10.5); write the introduction for a rhetorical analysis essay (W10.1).

Academic Vocabulary: Rhetorical analysis essay

Homework: Finish reading 51-100 of 1984 and complete 3-4 Dialectical Journal entries for Friday’s check.  There will be a test as well.

1. Do Now: Review Article from Monday
Open the page in your interactive notebook titled Rhetorical Analysis, review the notes, and the chart you created on the article “You Are a Suspect” by William Safire from the New York Times.  Be prepared to share your observations with the class.

2. Analyze Rhetoric Practice
Create another column to the right of your chart and title it Analysis/Effect.  As a class, we will discuss the various rhetorical choices the author made and how it effects the persuasiveness of the text.

3. Rhetorical Analysis Essay Notes
Copy and paste the following into a new page in your interactive notebook titled Rhetorical Analysis Essay Notes.

Basic Prompt: Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s rhetorical choices.

Introduction: Here is an outline for each of the elements in the introduction.  You can write these into 3-5 sentences as necessary.

1. Summarize the current situation/context in one brief sentence.
2. Author’s name, titles (if more than one), publication date, and genre (article, essay, etc.) with the basic topic of the piece.
3. Thesis: The author’s purpose (to inform, persuade, argue, present a theme), with their claim, what rhetorical choices you will analyze for effect, and the audience and tone.

Example Thesis: Johnson argues that technology causes dependency and hyperactivity in young children with a thorough appeal to logos, heart-wrenching diction, and purposeful parallel sentence structure sincerely for audience unaware of the issues.

Example Introduction.  (Do not plagiarize from this example.)

During the 1970′s women everywhere questioned their equality to men. Anne Roiphe’s “Confessions of a Female Chauvinist Sow” first appeared in the magazine New York in 1972. In this essay Roiphe aims to convince her readers that women must put faith in the idea that they are equal to men, not superior.  Personal anecdotes, contrast, and comparison are techniques Roiphe skillfully uses to create a strong, convincing essay for a female audience in need of encouragement and support.

4. Practice Introduction Paragraph
Write an introduction paragraph based on the same page Rhetorical Analysis Essay Notes page on the article “You Are Suspect.”  Be prepared to have your paragraph evaluated for the required elements.

Back up Interactive Notebook by Exporting as a PDF and saving on your student drive.

Current Situation: yellow
Author’s name: dark green
Titles, date, and genre: dark blue
Purpose: purple
Claim: red
Rhetorical choices: light blue
Audience: light green
Tone: light red/pink

Steps to Analyze Rhetoric Notes

Monday, April 14th, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

Learning Objectives: Summarize an article then determine what rhetorical choices the author made to convince readers (RI 10.6).

Academic Vocabulary: Rhetoric, Rhetorical Choices, Rhetorical Analysis, Appeals, and syntax

Homework: Finish reading pages 51-100 and add 3-4 Dialectical Journal entries from 1984 for Friday.

1. Do Now: Summarize Argument
Create a new page in your interactive notebook titled Rhetorical Analysis, read the short article “You Are a Suspect” by William Safire from the New York Times and write one-two sentences in which you summarize the article.  Make sure to include the title and author.

2. Rhetoric Notes
Copy the following notes directly onto the same page in your interactive notebook.  Read over them and discuss how they are familiar.  Can you think of an example of each?

Rhetoric is the art or power of language to argue and convince people of opinions successfully.  Arguments appeal to logos, ethos, and pathos as well as use rhetorical devices to convince readers.  When we write rhetorical analyses, we identify the elements the author uses and evaluate how these choices create meaning.

Steps to Analyze Rhetoric:

The following is taken and adapted from the College Board’s SOAPSTone Steps for Analyzing Non-Fiction.  You can follow these steps in or out of order as long as your rhetorical analysis includes the elements AND what effect each choice has.

1. Determine the Speaker and Occasion – Consider who is writing the article (are they trustworthy or biased?) and when and why they are writing about the issue.
2. Analyze Audience and Appeals- Consider who the intended audience is and locate the evidence that appeals to logos, ethos, and pathos.
3. Determine the Purpose – Is it to inform objectively? Is it to persuade?  Is it to satirize a fault in society?  Is it to make a thematic claim?
4. Analyze Style and Syntax – Are there rhetorical questions? Parallel phrases? Repeated motifs aka symbols/images? Purposeful grammar choices? Figurative language? Analogies or comparisons?
5. Analyze Tone and Diction – What is the tone of the author (Objective or Subjective)? How does the diction reveal the tone?

3. Locating Rhetoric Practice
Copy and paste the following chart, or create your own graphic organizer.  List details from the same article “You Are a Suspect.”  Later in the week, you will return to this article to analyze and connect what effect these rhetorical choices have.

Steps Details from “You Are a Suspect”
Determine the Speaker and Occasion   – Consider who is writing the article (are they trustworthy or biased?) and   when and why they are writing about the issue.
Analyze Audience and Appeals-   Consider who the intended audience is and locate the evidence that appeals to   logos, ethos, and pathos.
Determine the Purpose – Is it to inform objectively? Is it   to persuade?  Is it to satirize a fault   in society?  Is it to make a thematic   claim?
Analyze Style and Syntax   – Are their rhetorical questions? Parallel phrases? Repeated motifs aka   symbols/images? Purposeful grammar choices? Figurative language? Analogies or   comparisons? Hint: There is at   least one rhetorical question, at least one parallel phrase, at least one   repeated motif, and at least one analogy.
Analyze Tone and Diction   – What is the tone of the author (Objective or Subjective)? How does the   diction reveal the tone?

Rhetorical Practice

Monday, April 14th, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

ObjectiveSummarize an article then determine what rhetorical choices the author made to convince readers (RI 10.6).

Homework:  Continue reading pages 50-100 of 1984, and complete additional dialectal journal entries.

Academic Vocabulary:  SOAPSTone, Rhetoric, Orwellian

Do Now:  Create a new page in your interactive notebook titled “Rhetoric Notes”, and answer the following questions in that new page, followed by a sentence explaining why you chose what you did.  Remember, each question has more than 1 correct answer:

1. Which of the following does George Orwell use ironically?(3)

a. “He felt as though he were wandering in the forests of the sea bottom, lost in a monstrous world where he himself was the monster.” – Winston’s feelings about himself.

b. London has been virtually destroyed with “bombed sites where plaster dust swirled in the air.” – Narrator describing the setting in London.

c. The dominating Ministry of Truth is an enormous pyramid of “glittering white concrete.” – Narrator describing the Ministry of Truth building.

d. The Party’s slogan, “Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.”

e. Winston’s job at the Ministry of Truth is to “rectify” or fix records to create evidence supporting the Party.

 

2. What images, described in Winston’s dream of the naked woman, are archetypal symbols that suggest freedom?(4)

a. “summer evening”

b. “Golden Country”

c. “…swimming in the pools under the willow trees”

d. “The girl with dark hair”

e. “Her body was white and smooth”

 

Be sure to explain how you came to your answer, as though you were defending it.

  1. 1.      Summarizing Arguments

Create a new page in your interactive notebook titled Rhetorical Analysis, read the short article “You Are a Suspect” by William Safire from the New York Times and write one-two sentences in which you summarize the article.  Make sure to include the title and author.

  1. 2.      Rhetoric Notes

Copy the following notes directly onto the same page in your interactive notebook.  Read over them and discuss how they are familiar.  Can you think of an example of each?

Rhetoric is the art or power of language to argue and convince people of opinions successfully.  Arguments appeal to logos, ethos, and pathos as well as use rhetorical devices to convince readers.  When we write rhetorical analyses, we identify the elements the author uses and evaluate how these choices create meaning.

Steps to Analyze Rhetoric:

The following is taken and adapted from the College Board’s SOAPSTone Steps for Analyzing Non-Fiction.  You can follow these steps in or out of order as long as your rhetorical analysis includes the elements AND what affect each choice has.

1. Determine the Speaker and Occasion – Consider who is writing the article (are they trustworthy or biased?) and when and why they are writing about the issue.
2. Analyze Audience and Appeals- Consider who the intended audience is and locate the evidence that appeals to logos, ethos, and pathos.
3. Determine the Purpose – Is it to inform objectively? Is it to persuade?  Is it to satirize a fault in society?  Is it to make a thematic claim?
4. Analyze Style and Syntax – Are there rhetorical questions? Parallel phrases? Repeated motifs aka symbols/images? Purposeful grammar choices? Figurative language? Analogies or comparisons?
5. Analyze Tone and Diction – What is the tone of the author (Objective or Subjective)? How does the diction reveal the tone?

  1. 3.      Locating Rhetoric Practice

Copy and paste the following chart, or create your own graphic organizer.  List details from the same article “You Are a Suspect.”  Later in the unit, you will return to this article to analyze and connect what effect these rhetorical choices have.  Use citations.

Steps Details from “You Are a Suspect”
Determine the Speaker and Occasion   – Consider who is writing the article (are they trustworthy or biased?) and   when and why they are writing about the issue.
Analyze Audience and Appeals-   Consider who the intended audience is and locate the evidence that appeals to   logos, ethos, and pathos.
Determine the Purpose – Is it to inform objectively? Is it   to persuade?  Is it to satirize a fault   in society?  Is it to make a thematic   claim?
Analyze Style and Syntax   – Are their rhetorical questions? Parallel phrases? Repeated motifs aka   symbols/images? Purposeful grammar choices? Figurative language? Analogies or   comparisons? Hint: There is at   least one rhetorical question, at least one parallel phrase, at least one   repeated motif, and at least one analogy.
Analyze Tone and Diction   – What is the tone of the author (Objective or Subjective)? How does the   diction reveal the tone?

 

Imagined Drawing

Friday, April 11th, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

Learning Objectives: Answer multiple choice questions that assess ability to read and analyze literature independently (RL10.5, RL10.10).

Academic Vocabulary: All previous

Homework: Begin reading pages 51-100 of 1984 and complete 3-4 thorough Dialectical Journal entries.

1. Do Now: Review Pages 1-50
Take out reading log and open your Dialectical Journal, so Mrs. Walker can check it.  Review your DJ and the novel for a couple minutes before the test.  DO NOT BEGIN the test until notified.

2. 1984 Reading Test Pages 1-50
Log on to OARS and take the assessment.

3.  Imagined Drawing
Based on the chapter you are assigned, draw an image that represents something important.  It can be drawn in any way, literal, or abstract; however, do not sure any words in your drawing.  Write what inspired your piece on the back in pencil (so it doesn’t bleed through).

 

 

Page 1-50 quiz

Friday, April 11th, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

Objective: Analyze how journalists, propaganda, and other nonfiction use rhetoric (logos, ethos, and pathos) to advance their purpose 

Homework:  read the next 50 pages, and continue filling in your dialectical journals

Academic Vocabulary: See below.

Do Now: take out your reading log and dialectical journals and look over them quickly to study for the upcoming quiz.  Here is an online full-text version of 1984. 

  1. 1984 Quiz

Log in to OARS using THIS LINK and take your time with this assessment.

  1. Jigsaw

Moving forward in this unit there will be many terms that are repeated from earlier units, however, it has been awhile since you have used them.  Today, you will be put into groups and will be working to become a master of one term, which you will present to the class.  The following terms which need to be defined are:

  • Appeal to pathos
  • Appeal to logos
  • Appeal to ethos
  • Begging the question
  • Non sequiter
  • Post hoc, ergo propter hoc
  • Red Herring
  • Straw man

In your groups you will become an expert in your assigned device.  You will need to include the following in your presentation:

  1. The textbook definition.
  2. The definition in your own words
  3. An example of the word’s usage.

3. Presenting

What you will do now is present your findings to the class. This may be review for some of you, but these are concepts that we will be using extensively in this unit, so it is important that you have your memories refreshed.  If you are not presenting, you are to be taking notes on the definition and on the usage.

1984 dreams

Thursday, April 10th, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

Objectives: Students will understand how Orwell develops Winston’s character in relation to the world he lives in using the dystopian society of 1984.

Homework: Complete your dialectical journals and continue reading the first 50 pages.  You will have a short quiz on the reading tomorrow.

Academic Vocabulary: Orwellian, Utopia, Dystopia

Do Now:   On a new page titled “1984 dreams”, choose 3 statements, write whether you agree or disagree, and explain your opinion.

  • 1. People who are viewed as a threat to the government should be able to be held in prison without being charged.
  • 2. The government has a right to know what people are reading on the Internet so they may determine who might be a threat.
  • 3. Society would be safer if we had security cameras in public places to catch potential criminals.
  • 4. For an idea to exist, we must have words to express it.
  • 5.  History books always give an accurate portrayal of historical events.
  • 6.  I would risk my life to protect my freedom and the freedom of others.
  1. 1.      Historical Connection

As you have read, the Party stops at no length to ensure their complete domination of a person’s thoughts and opinions.  Read through this series of quotes and

Nazis

* “The broad mass of the nation … will more easily fall victim to a big lie than to a small one.” — Adolf Hitler, in his 1925 book Mein Kampf.
* “If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will eventually come to believe it.” — Nazi Propaganda Minister Joseph Goebbels.
* “Voice or no voice, the people can always be brought to the bidding of the leaders. That is easy. All you have to do is tell them they are being attacked and denounce the pacifists for lack of patriotism and exposing the country to danger. It works the same in any country.” — Nazi Reich Marshal Hermann Göring during the Nuremberg Trials.

Nineteen Eighty-Four

* “Remember our boys on the Malabar front! And the sailors in the Floating Fortresses! Just think what they have to put up with.”

* “The rocket bombs which fell daily on London were probably fired by the government of Oceania itself, ‘just to keep the people frightened’.”
* “The key-word here is blackwhite. Like so many Newspeak words, this word has two mutually contradictory meanings. Applied to an opponent, it means the habit of impudently claiming that black is white, in contradiction of the plain facts.”
* “To tell deliberate lies while genuinely believing in them, to forget any fact that has become inconvenient, and then when it becomes necessary again, to draw it back from oblivion for just so long as it is needed…”
* “The past was erased, the erasure was forgotten, the lie became truth.”
* “And if all others accepted the lie which the party imposed-if all records told the same tale-then the lie passed into history and became the truth.”

Choose one of the Nazi quotes and analyze it by comparing and contrasting it to one of the quotes from 1984.  How do you see the Nazi quotes echoed in what you have read so far of 1984?  Write 3-4 sentences with your partner on this topic.

  1. 2.      Analyzing Winston’s Dreams

Winston has a series of dreams within the first fifty pages of the text.  They all heavily symbolic and contain motifs seen throughout the rest of the text.  Read through the following, and pick out some of the recurring images and archetypes that you see.  Be sure to use the archetype handout you downloaded. Chapter 3  Consider the following as you read:

  • How does Orwell uses archetypes to convey a message in the dream?  What is the message that Winston experiences?
  • This is one of the only scenes of creativity we see in the first 50 pages, what does that say about how the Party affects a person’s mind?  Consider what the Nazi’s said.
  1. 3.      Dystopia vs. Utopia

Orwell presents us with the now stereotypical depiction of a dystopia, or place/state in which literally everything is unpleasant or bad.  However, the opposite of that is what is called a Utopia.  A book by the same name, written in 1516, can almost be seen as the precursor to 1984 in that many great ideas about government presented in this book are turned upside-down in 1984.  Read through the following short summary of Utopia and answer/discuss the questions that follow:

“The rulers are selected from the order of scholars. Language, social customs, religion, dress, architecture and education are identical in Utopia’s fifty-four cities. There is a large degree of uniformity and very little individual expression. Laws and social customs heavily regulate the private decisions of individuals. A child is re-assigned to another household if the child wishes to learn a trade other than his or her father’s. Households are composed of extended families, but family members can be relocated to other households if the distribution of adults per household becomes uneven within a given city.

The Utopians are a morally developed people though they are not Christians. Some of the Utopians’ beliefs run counter to the moral traditions of the Christian church (e.g. the Utopians encourage euthanasia when the patient is terminally ill). The Utopians believe that pride is the root of great evils. Accordingly, the Utopians have eliminated wealth, the nobility, private property, and currency. Labor and goods are distributed equally. Property is held in common. Everyone works the same hours and even though the rulers are exempt from public labor, they work to set a good example for the others. Work hours are equally distributed and there are no monasteries, convents, alehouses, or academies wherein an individual might withdraw from the rest of society. All Utopians are socially productive. “

  • What ironic representations of the land of Utopia can you see in 1984?
  • If you were given an island and told to rule it in your vision of a utopia, how would you rule?  Describe the type of government, majors laws, how citizens were meant to behave, how citizens were kept in line and abiding by those laws, etc.
  1. 4.      Dialectical Journals

You can take the rest of the class period to work on dialectical journals.  Make sure that you have at least 4 by tomorrow.