Welcome to Mrs. Walker's English Site. This website is for students enrolled in Mrs. Walker's 10th grade English classes and their parents. Below is a list of all recent activity related to these classes. Learn more about this site »

Announcements (New as of 4/14)

Monday, April 14th, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

New Announcement!!

Here is the schedule for 10th graders only.  The schedule for 9th, 11th, and 12th are different Tuesday and Wednesday.  See an 11th grade teacher, administrator, or Mr. King for that schedule.

Tuesday 4/15

7:30-9:28 Life Science Parts 1-2
9:28-9:38 BREAK
9:44-11:42 Dodge Ball Tourney (You need a permission slip to play – at student store)

Wednesday 4/16

7:30-8:50 Period 2
8:56-10:16 Period 4
10:22-11:42 Period 6

Thursday 4/17

7:30-8:50 Period 1
8:56-10:16 Period 3
10:22-11:42 Period 5

Friday 4/18

7:30-7:58 Period 1
8:04-8:38 Period 2
8:44-9:12 Period 3
9:18-9:46 Period 4
9:52-10:20 Period 5
10:26-10:52 Period 6
11:07-11:42 Rally

 

Do you have a question for Mrs. Walker?  I’m really nice. I promise!  Email me at millta@fusd.net.

Do you want to receive text notifications and assignment corrections on your phone?  Don’t worry: your phone number is kept private! Text the code @JoinHonors to the phone number (360) 529-5208

Body paragraphs and propaganda

Thursday, April 24th, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

Objective: Evaluate prepared rhetorical analysis body paragraphs and write one on “You Are A Suspect”.

Homework: Dialectical journals (3-4) and pages 101-150.

Academic Vocabulary:  Propaganda, rhetorical analysis

Do Now: Analyze the image on the board on a new page of your interactive notebook titled “body paragraphs and propaganda”

  • What does the image seem representative of?
  • What colors do you see portrayed by this image that may be archetypal? What do they mean?
  • Can you find an allusion to this in 1984?
  1. 1.      Body paragraph notes (written by you)

v  The two most common ways to format your body paragraphs are either chronologically (from the article’s start to finish) or by appeals (logos, ethos, pathos, audience, counterclaims).

v  Every body paragraph should be structured as follows:  Topic sentence (introduces the purpose of the paragraph), a brief discussion of the topic at hand, evidence followed by at least two sentences explaining it, another piece of evidence with explanation, and a closing/transitional sentence.

v  If an argument is pathological, you should be looking for the author’s use of connotative diction, primarily in a negative way.

v  If an argument is logical, it will always include facts, numbers, and other scholarly works.

  1. 2.      Writing a body paragraph

Now that we have seen 3 different body paragraphs, we have a good idea of what creates a solid body paragraph.  Use this time to create a piece of a body paragraph based upon “You are a Suspect”.  The topic of this body paragraph will be “appeals to pathos”.  Be ready to share.

  1. 3.      Writing your own

Now, you will be writing your own, complete body paragraph following the steps below.  The topic will be “audience”.

A. Identify publication source (publisher, website, organization, college)

B. Identify author’s intended audience–the likely readers of this publication

C. Describe how else we know–from the essay’s subject matter, argument, etc.–that this is the likely intended audience

D. Discuss why the author likely chose this audience and how you know this

E. Discuss who else might be included in the audience, why, and how you know this

F. Discuss who is likely excluded from the audience, why, and how you know this. * Note: Focus, though, on the primary intended audience above

  1. 4.      Switching

Just as we did on Tuesday, we will be switching computers with one another to broaden our reading of rhetorical analysis body paragraphs. Answer the following two questions, just as you did on Tuesday:

  1. 1.      What do you think is done well about these paragraphs?
  2. 2.      What should be changed or added in this paragraph, and how can it be made stronger?
  3. 5.      Propaganda

WWII Propaganda

Read through the following article about how the Nazis used propaganda, and answer the questions that follow.

1. According to the article, what is propaganda and how it is successful?

2. What are the various mediums for propaganda? For example, posters, …

3. List 5 purposes that Nazi propaganda had.  For example, to present Germany as a “defender of Western culture.”

4. Locate an example of Nazi or American propaganda and relate it to 1984, what similarities do you see in the poster?

5. Evaluate the purpose of the propaganda and the rhetorical choices that create meaning.  Consider the visual imagery, diction, colors, etc.

Propaganda of 1984

Wednesday, April 23rd, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

Learning Objectives: Evaluate Nazi and 1984 propaganda for rhetorical purpose and choices (RI10.6)

Academic Vocabulary: rhetorical analysis, evaluation, propaganda

Homework: Finish reading pages 101-150 and complete 3-4 Dialectical Journal entries for this Friday.

1. Do Now: Propaganda
Open the previous page your interactive notebook titled Propaganda. Follow this link to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and read/review the article about Nazi Propaganda.

Answer the following questions with a partner.  Be prepared to share your responses with the class.

  • 1. According to the article, what is propaganda and how it is successful?
  • 2. What are the various mediums for propaganda? For example, posters, …
  • 3. List 5 purposes that Nazi propaganda had.  For example, to present Germany as a “defender of Western culture.”
  • 4. Locate a real example of Nazi propaganda and insert it into your notebook.
  • 5. Evaluate the purpose of the propaganda and the rhetorical choices that create meaning.  Consider the visual imagery, diction, colors, etc.

2. Rhetorical Analysis of Visual Media Notes
Copy and Paste the following notes into your interactive notebook on the page titled Propaganda.

Consider the following rhetorical choices when analyzing visual media:

  • Layout and Framing (where are the images)
  • Imagery
  • Mood or Emotions
  • Symbolic Color, imagery, etc.
  • Connotative Diction

3. Create and Evaluate Propaganda from 1984
You will be assigned a topic to review in the novel 1984.  Complete the following tasks:

1. Research that topic in the novel to learn what the propaganda looks like, what its purpose is, how it is effective, and what inspired Orwell from real Nazi and Soviet Union propaganda.

2. Recreate the propaganda in poster form considering your rhetorical choices.

3. Prepare an organized, practiced presentation that (1) explains your assigned propaganda’s purpose, (2) evaluate how it worked in the novel, (3) what choices you made in your recreation and why, and (4) explain how Orwell transformed real propaganda from Germany and Soviet Union.

NOTE: The focus of this activity is your ability to evaluate the rhetorical choices in the propaganda from the novel 1984, not your artistic piece.

 

 

 

 

 

Propaganda

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

Learning Objectives: Write a rhetorical analysis body paragraph on “You Are a Suspect” (W10.1); Read about the purposes and techniques in Nazi Propaganda (RI10.2); Write a rhetorical analysis about Nazi Propaganda (W10.1)

Academic Vocabulary: Propaganda

Homework: Finish reading pages 101-150 and complete 3-4 Dialectical Journal entries for this Friday.

1. Do Now: Write Practice Rhetorical Analysis Body Paragraph
Using the examples and the list of required elements on the page in your interactive notebook titled Rhetorical Analysis Essay Notes, write a body paragraph that analyzes one rhetorical choice or two related rhetorical choices for the article “You are a Suspect.”  Include the effect of that choice and how it relates to the purpose or audience of the piece.

Be prepared to post your body paragraph on Turnitin.com.

2. Respond to Peer Paragraphs
Log on to Turnitin.com, go to the Discussion tab, and have one person from your pair post your body paragraph.  Make sure to type both partner’s names below the paragraph.

Then, both individually, choose one or more body paragraphs and reply, making sure to ADD evidence or explanation to improve the paragraph.  DO NOT SAY it is good or bad.

3. Propaganda
Create a new page in your interactive notebook titled Propaganda. Follow this link to the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, and read the article about Nazi Propaganda.

Answer the following questions with a partner:

  • 1. According to the article, what is propaganda and how it is successful?
  • 2. What are the various mediums for propaganda? For example, posters, …
  • 3. List 5 purposes that Nazi propaganda had.  For example, to present Germany as a “defender of Western culture.”
  • 4. Locate a real example of Nazi propaganda and insert it into your notebook.
  • 5. Evaluate the purpose of the propaganda and the rhetorical choices that create meaning.  Consider the visual imagery, diction, colors, etc.

Body paragraph notes

Tuesday, April 22nd, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

Objective Evaluate prepared rhetorical analysis body paragraphs and write one on “You Are A Suspect”.

Homework:  Dialectical journals (3-4) and pages 101-150.

Academic Vocabulary: Rhetorical analysis.

Do Now:  Finish working on your introduction paragraph.  If you have already finished, begin color coding the sentences.  After you have finished, we will be switching with another person in the class, and you will respond to the following two prompts on the same page as the paragraph:

  1. 1.      What do you think is done well about this introduction?
  2. 2.      What should be changed in this introduction, and how can it be made stronger?
  3. 1.  Taking your own notes

We will be creating our own notes on body paragraphs.  In pairs create a new page titled “body paragraph notes”, read through the following paragraphs, and write a list of notes to share with the class.  Consider the following:

  • Create a list of what is required structurally within the paragraph (sentence referring to the thesis, transitional sentence, evidence, etc.)
  • What appeal is the author primarily using?  How do you know?
  • What is effective about this paragraph? (does it contain facts/quotes/statistics from the main article.)
  • Does the paragraph talk about any specific rhetorical elements other than logos/pathos?  If so, what are they?

Paragraph One: In addition to this diction, Hazlitt uses several syntactical strategies to convey his point about poverty.  The most obvious of these is his one massive, extended sentence, which reaches across two or three standard-sized paragraphs.  This huge sentence models the massive obstacle course the impoverished must face in life; because of Hazlitt’s negative word choice, the life of the poor is presented as a continual, unending stream of oppression.  This stream-like idea of misfortune is further mirrored by the idea that there are no breaks for the poor, no passes, or rests, and this simply allows the despondency of the passage to build for over 40 lines.  This compilation of misfortunes without end is enough to convince almost anyone of the horrors of poverty, and is certainly enough to dissuade any idealistic notions of happiness within poverty.

Paragraph Two:  President John F. Kennedy has many other rhetorical strategies in his passage.  He uses listing to help further prove his point; he uses quotations from people in the steel companies, and he uses detail.  In a way, President JFK also uses a technique in his speech called repetition.  Repetition is not directly in his speech, but it is more indirect.  In the president’s inaugural address speech he said the very famous quote “ask not what your contry can do for you, but what you can do for your country”, he also in his speech regarding the increased steel prices, asked that same question in a different way.  He asked the American people to reflect on that statement, and then he told them about how he asked the steel companies that same question and that is enough to get everyone ready to fight alongside him.

Paragraph Three: Johnson’s second paragraph is marked by a logical explanation as to why he will not seek patronage for the lady’s son.  The use of this rhetorical device has several implications.  At base, it indicates a respect for the knowledge and though process of the mother in that he is willing to explain his decision in plain terms rather than dumbing it down.  Additionally, it conveys a certain severity as Johnson forces the mother to admit that “that was no reason” why he should write the letter.  Ultimately, logos forces the mother to recognize faults in her decision to ask Johnson for his assistance, thus further separating himself from the rejection.

  1. 2.  Writing a body paragraph

Now that we have seen 3 different body paragraphs, we have a good idea of what creates a solid body paragraph.  Use this time to create a piece of a body paragraph based upon “You are a Suspect”.  The topic of this body paragraph will be “appeals to pathos”.  Be ready to share.

  1. 3.  Writing you own

Now, you will be writing your own, complete body paragraph following the steps below.  The topic will be “audience”.

A. Identify publication source (publisher, website, organization, college)

B. Identify author’s intended audience–the likely readers of this publication

C. Describe how else we know–from the essay’s subject matter, argument, etc.–that this is the likely intended audience

D. Discuss why the author likely chose this audience and how you know this

E. Discuss who else might be included in the audience, why, and how you know this

F. Discuss who is likely excluded from the audience, why, and how you know this. * Note: Focus, though, on the primary intended audience above.

Rhetorical Analysis Example Body Paragraphs

Monday, April 21st, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

Learning Objectives: Evaluate prepared rhetorical analysis body paragraphs and write one on “You Are A Suspect” (W10.1,10.4)

Academic Vocabulary: rhetorical analysis

Homework: Begin reading pages 101-150 and complete 3-4 Dialectical Journal entries for next Friday.

1. Do Now: Rhetorical Analysis Introduction Paragraph
Review the Rhetorical Analysis Essay Notes in your interactive notebook.  Read your introduction paragraph about the article “You Are a Suspect,” and make sure it has the following elements.  Highlight them according to the assigned colors:

  • Current Situation: yellow
  • Author’s name: dark green
  • Titles, date, and genre: dark blue
  • Purpose: purple
  • Claim: red
  • Rhetorical choices: light blue
  • Audience: light green
  • Tone: light red/pink

2. Example Rhetorical Analysis Body Paragraphs
Read the following rhetorical analysis body paragraphs written by students taking the AP English Language and Composition Test.  What does the paragraph do? What does the author include?  Create a list of requirements based on these examples in the same page in your interactive notebook.

Example #1

Louv uses an anecdote to advance his claim.  He recounts a friend’s story of being pushed to buy an in-car multimedia system, using hyperbolic descriptions such as “the salesman’s jaw dropped to the floor” in order to create dramatic effect.  The result of his description of the event is that he leads the reader to experience the same annoyance the customer must have felt in the anecdote.  By making the anecdote seem like a common event, he attempts to show that the salesman’s attitude towards dependence on technology is one that is nearly universal in today’s society.  Through the anecdote, Louv shows the common opinion of a constant need for technology and his disapproval of that opinion.

Example#2

Kelly also crafts her argument with literary techniques and devices, which place Kelley’s suggestions in a more favorable light.  In the body of her speech, Kelly uses parallel structure to start each paragraph, emphasizing the similar injustice of the laws “in Alabama,” “in George,” and “in Pennsylvania.”  This notion of unfairness is furthered by her diction when she simultaneously praises the United States as a “great industrial” country while condemning many state law as a “great evil.”  Additionally, Kelly uses the oxymoron of “pitiful privilege” to describe the hypocritical nature of New Jersey’s laws.

Example #3

Johnson’s second paragraph is marked by a logical explanation as to why he will not seek patronage for the lady’s son.  The use of this rhetorical device has several implications.  At base, it indicates a respect for the knowledge and though process of the mother in that he is willing to explain his decision in plain terms rather than dumbing it down.  Additionally, it conveys a certain severity as Johnson forces the mother to admit that “that was no reason” why he should write the letter.  Ultimately, logos forces the mother to recognize faults in her decision to ask Johnson for his assistance, thus further separating himself from the rejection.

3. Write Practice Rhetorical Analysis Body Paragraph
Using the examples and the list of required elements, write a body paragraph that analyzes one rhetorical choice or two related rhetorical choices for the article “You are a Suspect.”  Include the effect of that choice and how it relates to the purpose or audience of the piece.

Be prepared to post your body paragraph on Turnitin.com.

Choose one or more body paragraphs and reply, making sure to ADD evidence or explanation to improve the paragraph.  DO NOT SAY IT IS GOOD OR BAD!!

 

 

 

Rhetorical Analysis Introduction.

Monday, April 21st, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

Objective: Analyze “You are a Suspect” for rhetorical choices that have purpose; write the introduction for a rhetorical analysis essay. (RI10.5) (W10.1).

Homework:  Continue reading 1984 (pages 100-150), and complete your dialectical journals.

Academic Vocabulary:  Rhetorical choices, claim, rhetorical analysis.

Do Now:  Create a new page titled “Rhetorical analysis introduction”.  Read through the following short article on the changing of the English language, and respond the questions that follow.  Be ready to present your answers: Newspeak and texting

  • What is the author’s main argument, and what side does she take? 
  • To whom is she writing this article for?
  • What type of appeal does she use most, and is it effective?
  1. 1.      Review

Open up the page titled “Rhetorical practice” and review the boxes you filled in for the article “You Are A Suspect”.  Be prepared to discuss with the class.

  1. 2.      As A Class

We will be going over this article looking at some of the primary rhetorical choices made by the author, and evaluating the effectiveness of those choices and how they relate to the overall effectiveness of the text.  Please take notes on your new page.

  1. 3.      What Your Intro  Should Contain

We will only be working on the introduction today.  It is similar to what you are used to doing; however, there are a few differences.  Copy/paste the following notes into the new page:

  1. Give a brief summary of the situation (give context to when the argument was introduced)
  2. Introduce the author and title, follow that by briefly describing the argument’s topic.
  3. Your thesis: The author’s purpose (inform, persuade, argue, present a theme), what their claim is, their rhetorical choices, along with the audience and tone.

Example Introduction (using an article we have read):

The technological revolution is changing the way in which we communicate ideas and emotions with one another.  In the article “Newspeak behind text messaging destruction of the English language?” author Joyce Sinclair is presenting the reader with the possible future of the English language.  Sinclair provides historical context to the issue and uses the opinions of educators and linguists to give an objective overview to concerned parents of the issues inherent within text-speak’s use in an academic setting.

  1. 4.      Writing

We will now be writing an introduction paragraph based on the article “You Are A Suspect.”  Use the three steps listed above, and be sure to include all of the bolded material.  Color-code it as follows:

Current Situation: yellow
Author’s name: dark green
Titles, date, and genre: dark blue
Purpose: purple
Claim: red
Rhetorical choices: light blue
Audience: light green
Tone: light red/pink

51-100 Reading Test

Friday, April 18th, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

Learning Objectives: Show ability to read and analyze 1984 independently by taking a select response assessment (RL10.10).

Academic Vocabulary: All Previous

Homework: Begin reading pages 101-150 and complete 3-4 Dialectical Journal entries for next Friday.

1. Do Now: Review
Take out your reading log and Dialectical Journal for Mrs. Walker to check.  Log on to OARS.  Do not begin the test until instructed to do so.

Review the reading and your DJ entries to study.

2. 1984 51-100 Reading Test
Take the select response assessment on OARS.

Quiz

Friday, April 18th, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

Objectives:  Students will all do well on the assessment.
Homework: Please read the next portion of 1984, pages 100-150, and begin the dialectical journals for that week.
Do Now: Take out your dialectical journal and reading logs.  You will have 5 minutes to review.
1.    Quiz
Log on HERE and take the quiz.  You will have all period to turn it in.
2.    After
Once you are done, please feel free to work on your dialectical journals for next week, or start on next week’s reading.  Here is a link to an online version of 1984.  Please work quietly.

Newspeak

Thursday, April 17th, 2014
By Mr. Modereger

Objective:  Students will evaluate the argument and specific claims in a text, assessing whether the reasoning is valid and the evidence is relevant and sufficient; identify false statements and fallacious reasoning. (RI 10.8)

Homework:  Continue reading 1984.  Bring your reading log and dialectical journal tomorrow.

Academic vocabulary:  Newspeak, Doublethink, Orwellian, conformity.

Do Now:  Watch the following clip, and, on a new page titled “Newspeak”, answer the questions that follow.  LINK

  • What imagery do you see in the clip which you have seen in 1984?
  • What is the general tone of the commercial?
  • What is the commercial saying about Apple Computers?  Consider the imagery of the commercial, and the themes of 1984.
  1. 1.      Examining Newspeak

Newspeak is the language which The Party is pushing on the premise that one day all thoughtcrime will be impossible, because it will be impossible to think wrongly.  The language is being changed drastically.  Read through this excerpt from chapter 5 and consider the questions that follow.  Answer in the form of a paragraph after discussing with a partner.  chapter 5

  • What is Syme’s general argument for creating Newspeak?
  • Who does Winston put his faith in to continue the English language?  Does it remind you of a letter we read at the beginning of this unit?
  • Is it plausible that by destroying words you could also destroy the thoughts and feelings that coincide with them?
  • In your lifetime, have you seen any instances of words being shortened or changed, while still maintaining a similar idea?
  1. 2.      Newnewspeak

After reading the excerpt from chapter 5, you should have a general understanding of the purpose behind Newspeak and the destruction of language.  What we will do now is move into a modern form of Newspeak, and analyze how well it can be understood.  Read through these poems which were text-in to T-Mobile as a part of a contest, and guess which one won first place:

ENTRY ONE

O hart tht sorz

My luv adorz

He mAks me liv

He mAks me giv

Myslf 2 him

As my luv porz

ENTRY TWO

The wet rustle of rain

can dampen today. Your text

buoys me above oil-rainbow puddles

like a paper boat, so that even

soaked to the skin

I am grinning.

Can you decipher the first one?  In a few sentences, write what the first poem is about.  Also, guess which was first and which was second.

After, see if you can guess these translations of very popular Shakespearean lines:

  • 2b or no 2b thts ?
  • a @(—`— by any oth nme wd sml swEt
  • rm rm w4Ru rm?

 

  1. 3.       A Modern Approach

Read the following article, and fill out the box for SOAPSTone with a partner, just as you did on Monday.  Answer the questions that follow.  Newspeak behind text messaging destruction of the English language

Steps Details from “ Newspeak behind text messaging destruction of the English language?

Determine the Speaker and Occasion   – Consider who is writing the article (are they trustworthy or biased?) and why they are writing about the issue.  
Analyze Audience and Appeals-   Consider who the intended audience is and locate the evidence that appeals to   logos, ethos, and pathos.  
Determine the Purpose – Is it to inform objectively? Is it   to persuade?  Is it to satirize a fault   in society?  Is it to make a thematic   claim?  
Analyze Style and Syntax   – Are their rhetorical questions? Parallel phrases? Repeated motifs aka   symbols/images? Purposeful grammar choices? Figurative language? Analogies or   comparisons?
Analyze Tone and Diction   – What is the tone of the author (Objective or Subjective)? How does the   diction reveal the tone?  

 

  • Can you summarize the author’s main points?  Use the name of the article and author.
  • How does textspeak relate to the novel 1984?  Do you see any similarities between it and Syme’s Newspeak?
  • How could a written language like textspeak influence the way we think?  Would it be positive or negative?

Rhetorical Analysis Introduction

Wednesday, April 16th, 2014
By Mrs. Walker

Learning Objectives: Analyze “You are Suspect” for rhetorical choices that have purpose (RI10.5); write the introduction for a rhetorical analysis essay (W10.1).

Academic Vocabulary: Rhetorical analysis essay

Homework: Finish reading 51-100 of 1984 and complete 3-4 Dialectical Journal entries for Friday’s check.  There will be a test as well.

1. Do Now: Review Article from Monday
Open the page in your interactive notebook titled Rhetorical Analysis, review the notes, and the chart you created on the article “You Are a Suspect” by William Safire from the New York Times.  Be prepared to share your observations with the class.

2. Analyze Rhetoric Practice
Create another column to the right of your chart and title it Analysis/Effect.  As a class, we will discuss the various rhetorical choices the author made and how it effects the persuasiveness of the text.

3. Rhetorical Analysis Essay Notes
Copy and paste the following into a new page in your interactive notebook titled Rhetorical Analysis Essay Notes.

Basic Prompt: Analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of the author’s rhetorical choices.

Introduction: Here is an outline for each of the elements in the introduction.  You can write these into 3-5 sentences as necessary.

1. Summarize the current situation/context in one brief sentence.
2. Author’s name, titles (if more than one), publication date, and genre (article, essay, etc.) with the basic topic of the piece.
3. Thesis: The author’s purpose (to inform, persuade, argue, present a theme), with their claim, what rhetorical choices you will analyze for effect, and the audience and tone.

Example Thesis: Johnson argues that technology causes dependency and hyperactivity in young children with a thorough appeal to logos, heart-wrenching diction, and purposeful parallel sentence structure sincerely for audience unaware of the issues.

Example Introduction.  (Do not plagiarize from this example.)

During the 1970′s women everywhere questioned their equality to men. Anne Roiphe’s “Confessions of a Female Chauvinist Sow” first appeared in the magazine New York in 1972. In this essay Roiphe aims to convince her readers that women must put faith in the idea that they are equal to men, not superior.  Personal anecdotes, contrast, and comparison are techniques Roiphe skillfully uses to create a strong, convincing essay for a female audience in need of encouragement and support.

4. Practice Introduction Paragraph
Write an introduction paragraph based on the same page Rhetorical Analysis Essay Notes page on the article “You Are Suspect.”  Be prepared to have your paragraph evaluated for the required elements.

Back up Interactive Notebook by Exporting as a PDF and saving on your student drive.

Current Situation: yellow
Author’s name: dark green
Titles, date, and genre: dark blue
Purpose: purple
Claim: red
Rhetorical choices: light blue
Audience: light green
Tone: light red/pink